Contributor: Shaun Gunner

Tolkien’s drawing of the Doors of Durin in The Fellowship of the Ring, recreated in the films, is a well-known scene in The Lord of the Rings – now imagine building it in your own home.

Leslie Megahey, known for his 1968 BBC documentary Tolkien in Oxford, will be the Guest Speaker at the Tolkien Society’s 2015 Annual Dinner to be held in Arundel on 11th April 2015.

Posted by on 1 March 2015

Telling friends, family and work colleagues that you’re “really into Tolkien” can provoke both amusement and bemusement. We’re used to this; we’re also used to being asked the same familiar questions again and again. I’ve pooled together a selection of the most-asked questions with a handy cheat-sheet of suggested answers.

The new “Tolkien-Gordon Collection” at the University of Leeds focusses on Tolkien’s time at the University as well as his collaboration with E.V. Gordon, with whom he worked on Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.

Middle-earth Festival, previously known as both “Middle-earth Weekend” and “Tolkien Weekend”, will return this September after a two-and-half-year hiatus.

Recently, my colleague Daniel Helen argued that more films set in Middle-earth were highly unlikely. I disagree. And here’s why.

Tolkien’s drawing of the Doors of Durin in The Fellowship of the Ring, recreated in the films, is a well-known scene in The Lord of the Rings – now imagine building it in your own home.

The new “Tolkien-Gordon Collection” at the University of Leeds focusses on Tolkien’s time at the University as well as his collaboration with E.V. Gordon, with whom he worked on Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.

Leslie Megahey, known for his 1968 BBC documentary Tolkien in Oxford, will be the Guest Speaker at the Tolkien Society’s 2015 Annual Dinner to be held in Arundel on 11th April 2015.

Middle-earth Festival, previously known as both “Middle-earth Weekend” and “Tolkien Weekend”, will return this September after a two-and-half-year hiatus.

Posted by on 1 March 2015

Telling friends, family and work colleagues that you’re “really into Tolkien” can provoke both amusement and bemusement. We’re used to this; we’re also used to being asked the same familiar questions again and again. I’ve pooled together a selection of the most-asked questions with a handy cheat-sheet of suggested answers.

Recently, my colleague Daniel Helen argued that more films set in Middle-earth were highly unlikely. I disagree. And here’s why.

About the Author: Shaun Gunner
Shaun is the current Chair of The Tolkien Society. Elected in 2013, Shaun regularly speaks about adaptations of Tolkien's works whilst passionately believing the Society needs to reach out to new audiences. In his spare time can be found in the cinema, playing video games and Lego, or on Twitter.