Contributor: Daniel Helen

A long-planned Middle-earth film museum is likely to be situated on the waterfront of Wellington, New Zealand, according to a new Development Plan being discussed by the city council, reports the Dominion Post.

[The original version of this article appeared in Portuguese on the Tolkien Brasil website.] About eighteen years ago, when I first began reading J.R.R. Tolkien, I could never imagine that I would be one of the many enthusiasts spread around the world with serious objectives of analysing the Professor’s works, not only as entertainment but […]

The British Library is set to preserve a recording of Tolkien’s voice from 1929 as part of its “Save our Sounds” project.

The Book of Lost Tales Part 2 will be the focus of the next free-to-attend Mythgard Academy online class hosted by Corey Olsen of the Mythgard Institute.

John D. Rateliff’s A Brief History of The Hobbit has been published. The tome is a reduced version of Rateliff’s The History of The Hobbit, first published in two volumes in 2007.

This is such a common question at the moment, I think it deserves its own blog post. The short answer is no – or, at least, not any time soon.

A long-planned Middle-earth film museum is likely to be situated on the waterfront of Wellington, New Zealand, according to a new Development Plan being discussed by the city council, reports the Dominion Post.

The Book of Lost Tales Part 2 will be the focus of the next free-to-attend Mythgard Academy online class hosted by Corey Olsen of the Mythgard Institute.

[The original version of this article appeared in Portuguese on the Tolkien Brasil website.] About eighteen years ago, when I first began reading J.R.R. Tolkien, I could never imagine that I would be one of the many enthusiasts spread around the world with serious objectives of analysing the Professor’s works, not only as entertainment but […]

John D. Rateliff’s A Brief History of The Hobbit has been published. The tome is a reduced version of Rateliff’s The History of The Hobbit, first published in two volumes in 2007.

The British Library is set to preserve a recording of Tolkien’s voice from 1929 as part of its “Save our Sounds” project.

This is such a common question at the moment, I think it deserves its own blog post. The short answer is no – or, at least, not any time soon.

About the Author: Daniel Helen
Daniel is an Officer without Portfolio and Trustee of The Tolkien Society. Elected in 2014, he is mainly responsible for the Society's digital operations, including this website.